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Trump tells other countries to protect own Gulf shipping

Trump tells other countries to protect own Gulf shippingPresident Donald Trump on Monday told other countries to protect their own Gulf oil shipments, declaring that the United States has only limited strategic interest in the "dangerous" region. As for Iran's threats to shut sea lanes used to transport a large portion of the world's oil exports through the Persian Gulf, Washington is not concerned, Trump said.



Miss Hooters Tennessee finalist arrested, accused of trashing boyfriend's house after breakup

Miss Hooters Tennessee finalist arrested, accused of trashing boyfriend's house after breakupMadison Rogers, Miss Hooters Tennessee contestant, faces burglary and vandalism charges after police said she destroyed part of ex-boyfriend's house.



Would U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers Lose a War to Iran?

Would U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers Lose a War to Iran?The recent oil tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman reinforce the need to reestablish a highly visible U.S. naval deterrent in the Middle East. For eight months last year, no aircraft carrier strike group plied the region, the longest such interruption this millennium. With the United States needing a more robust posture against Iran and confronting renewed challenges in Asia and Europe, several immediate measures and concerted longer-term efforts are critical to ensure America has the carriers it needs.The requirement to maintain carrier presence in the Middle East is a critical part of a broader national security strategy, in which U.S. global security interests necessitate a worldwide force presence. Indeed, the Navy's mission demands remain as high as those of the Cold War, calling on ships to be everywhere seemingly at once, but today's fleet is less than half the size it was 30 years ago.During the Obama administration, a “rebalance” supposedly allowed the Pentagon to focus on Asia and Europe while washing its hands of the Middle East. In reality, we never effectively rebalanced forces in the Indo-Pacific, and the situation on the ground forced us to remain deeply involved in the Middle East. Now with a growing Iranian threat, it would be imprudent to suddenly abandon the region, even as we face renewed challenges in the Pacific, Atlantic and Mediterranean.Indeed, Iran’s threat to the region continues growing as its recent attacks against oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman demonstrate. Its reliance on violent sectarianism helps fuel Sunni extremist groups like ISIS. This also places Tehran’s proxies on the borders of key U.S. allies. Beginning next year, Tehran can start upgrading its conventional and missile arsenals as U.N. arms embargoes expire. It is also threatening to resume progress toward nuclear weapons.The Trump Administration is pursuing robust sanctions, but these alone are likely insufficient to prevent Tehran’s aggression and reassure our regional allies.Credible forward deployed military capability – like a carrier strike group – provides real options for American policymakers. Last month’s intelligence suggesting Iran was ready to move against U.S. interests in the Middle East demonstrates how the absence of such forces could embolden Iran. Responding to this intelligence, the prompt movement of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group into the region has dramatically increased the U.S. force posture. Effective deterrence of Iran will require persistent, visible, and credible military capability.A combination of far-reaching and short-term policy changes can address this challenge.



UK foreign minister Hunt says cannot envisage joining U.S.-led war with Iran

UK foreign minister Hunt says cannot envisage joining U.S.-led war with IranBritain does not expect the United States to request that the United Kingdom joins a war with Iran and London would be unlikely to agree to join such a conflict, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said on Tuesday. "The U.S. is our closest ally, we talk to them the whole time, we consider any requests that they say carefully, but I cannot envisage any situation where they request or we agree to any moves to go to war," Hunt told parliament.



University of Utah Student Mackenzie Lueck Missing for Nearly a Week After Taking Lyft

University of Utah Student Mackenzie Lueck Missing for Nearly a Week After Taking LyftSLC Police DepartmentMackenzie Lueck, a 23-year-old University of Utah student, texted her parents on June 17 to let them know she had landed safely at the Salt Lake City airport, her father told Fox News. Nobody has heard from her in the week since. According to police, Lueck landed home from a trip around 1 a.m. She then ordered a Lyft to an unfamiliar address in North Salt Lake City, The Salt Lake Tribune reports. According to friends, Lueck’s phone has been off since she went missing, her car is still at her home, and her luggage hasn’t been found. She has not shown up to work, or class, since that early morning ride. Lueck's dad told local Fox station KTSU his daughter texted he and his wife to tell them her flight landed around 1 a.m. on Monday, June 17. Her family officially reported her missing that Thursday.Though Lueck has been missing for nearly a week, and police are investigating her disappearance, a formal search party has not been set up, the Tribune reports. In a press release issued by the Salt Lake City police department on Saturday, investigators said they have not “discovered any information that would lead us to believe that Mackenzie has been harmed or is in danger at this time.” In the same release, police also said “detectives are concerned for Mackenzie’s welfare.” Lyft has been working with Utah police to help trace Lueck's last known whereabouts, the Tribune reports.The ride share company told Fox News that the car’s route showed no irregularities, Lueck was successfully dropped off at her desired destination, and the driver began picking up more passengers immediately after her ride was complete. Authorities said they've been in contact with Lueck's apparent driver, but have not provided details of their account. “We’ve confirmed with Lyft, the app, that’s where she requested to go, and with the driver that that’s where she did go,” Salt Lake City Police Sargeant Brandon Shearer told ABC News. Shearer said the driver and Lyft have been cooperative. Lyft told Fox News in a statement on Sunday that they “recognize how scary this must be for those who know and love Ms. Lueck... The safety of our community is fundamental to Lyft and we are actively assisting law enforcement with their investigations.”Lueck, who reportedly goes by “Kenzie,” is a member of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority, according to the Tribune. Her sorority sister Ashley Fine has been organizing volunteers to help in the informal search. Fine told The Salt Lake Tribune she does not know why her friend, who does not have a significant other, would have taken a ride to the address in North Salt Lake, instead of going directly to her home. As part of the community effort to find her, Lueck's friends organized a postering event at Liberty Park in Salt Lake City on Saturday. A Facebook page with over 2,000 members has also been set up to help spread the word about her disappearance.“Everyone thinks that there’s danger in this story,” Fine told a local abc news affiliate. “Things aren’t adding up. She had another trip planned,” Fine said. “She’s making those plans with friends and family to have plans for the future. I don’t think she would hurt herself or anything like that... If you’re in a bad situation, please reach out... We’re really concerned for you.”Anyone with information about Lueck’s whereabouts is encouraged to contact Salt Lake City Police at 801-799-3000 and reference case No. 19-111129.This is a developing story.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



Cruise ship rescues and mishaps: 6 times emergency struck on Royal Caribbean, Carnival, more

Cruise ship rescues and mishaps: 6 times emergency struck on Royal Caribbean, Carnival, moreHere's what happens when emergency strikes on the high seas, from norovirus on a Royal Caribbean cruise to Coast Guard airlifts from Carnival Pride.



Mahathir Says He Underestimated Challenge of Governing Malaysia

Mahathir Says He Underestimated Challenge of Governing Malaysia(Bloomberg) -- Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said he underestimated the challenges of governing the country before his shock election victory last year.“I underestimated because we were on the outside and we didn’t get any information on what was happening on the inside,” Mahathir said in an interview with Bloomberg Television’s Haslinda Amin in Bangkok at the 5th Bloomberg Asean Business Summit. “We are having a very tough time dealing with damages in the finances as well as the crimes that were committed.”Here are some key comments from the interview:1MDBGoldman Sachs offered “a little compensation” versus the “huge killing” it made, Mahathir said, noting he was unsure where the money lost from the 1MDB scandal has gone.The scandal surrounding 1MDB sprawls from the U.S. to Switzerland, reaching the highest levels of Malaysian politics while ensnaring Goldman Sachs Group Inc. in its first criminal case. Mahathir has raised the amount he wants to recoup from 1MDB to $7 billion after previously saying he sought $4.5 billion that U.S. prosecutors estimated went missing from the state fund. So far, the Southeast Asian country has brought back less than $500 million.Mahathir said in May he was awaiting a response from Goldman Sachs before deciding whether to take legal action against the bank over “too high” fees on 1MDB bond sales. Malaysia had already announced criminal charges against Goldman in December, accusing the lender of misleading investors when it knew that funds raised from the $6.5 billion bond offer it arranged would be misappropriated. The bank said it will defend against the allegations.ChinaMahathir disagreed he was sending a message to the U.S. by taking China’s side on certain issues. It’s “free speech,” he said. “I don’t like the old idea of cooking something up in the West and then asking us to accept them. China is a bit more sensitive to our feelings.”On the resumed multi-billion dollar rail project, he said: “We were able to renegotiate the terms of the contract. It is quite obvious that the contract was overpriced.,” he said. The government considered dropping the project altogether “but did not want to pay huge compensation on it.”The project will now cost 44 billion ringgit ($10.7 billion) instead of the original 65.5 billion ringgit, according to a statement from the prime minister’s office in April.SuccessionLast May, Mahathir led Malaysia to its first change in government since its independence from Britain in 1957. The country is set for another political shift as he is expected to hand over power to Anwar Ibrahim, who said Mahathir had made it “very clear” that Anwar would get the top seat by May next year.Mahathir said he will hand over to Anwar in “a year or so.” He doesn’t want to leave Malaysia in shambles, he said, pointing to the state of the country when his predecessor Najib Razak was ousted.“I made a promise, I keep my promise,” Mahathir said. When asked why he was reluctant to set a date for the handover, Mahathir said it was because “there may be something I need to do before I step down,” noting he wanted to fix Malaysia’s debt.When asked whether he had changed, Mahathir replied: “I don’t know, I’m still myself. Well I want to work for the country. I don’t have much of a future so the last thing I want to do is to go away leaving the country in shambles, like the previous one.”EconomyMahathir has trimmed state spending to narrow the budget deficit to 3.4% of gross domestic product this year, from a five-year high of 3.7% last year. Fiscal recovery remains fragile as the government spends billions rescuing troubled institutions from the Hajj fund to an agency overseeing farmers. His administration replaced a sweeping goods-and-services tax with a more targeted consumption tax last year, and is now counting on state oil company dividends to support revenue.The government would be careful in choosing buyers for beleaguered national carrier Malaysian Airlines Bhd, he said Friday, noting: “If there is a good offer, we will consider.”(Updates with Mahathir comment in 14th paragraph. An earlier version of this story corrected a quote in 3rd and 11th paragraphs from story that moved on Friday.)To contact the reporters on this story: Yudith Ho in Kuala Lumpur at yho35@bloomberg.net;Anisah Shukry in Kuala Lumpur at ashukry2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and Reddit

No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and RedditWhat better way to start off the week than by not being able to use virtually any online service or access half of the internet's most popular sites? That seems to be the case, as DownDetector (and many tweets) suggest that Google, Amazon, Reddit, and Spectrum -- just to name a few -- are experiencing issues this morning. Those issues appear to have begun around 6 or 7 AM ET, just as the East Coast was starting its day.Although some of these connection problems appear to be clearing up as of 8:40 AM (for example, Feedly is finally loading for me after being inaccessible since before 8:00 AM), it's likely going to take some time before everything is running smoothly again. Reports are still going up on DownDetector as of writing.It's unclear what is causing half of the internet to go down, but an ominous message from Discord refers to the issue as a "general internet outage," which doesn't sound like something that should be possible:https://twitter.com/ChrisGSeaton/status/1143136635153977345About an hour ago, internet service company Cloudflare says that it "identified a possible route leak impacting some Cloudflare IP ranges." [UPDATE: To be clear, Verizon was responsible for the outage, and Cloudflare was just keeping its customers informed during the recovery process.]Cloudflare followed up with another update about an hour later explaining that the leak "is impacting many internet services including Cloudflare," and moments later, announced that the network responsible for the leak had fixed the issues as of 8:42 AM ET. In theory, the worst of the outage is over.We'll be keeping an eye out for any residual issues that pop up in the hours to come, but we also hope to get a more detailed explanation for why this happened from the network responsible in the near future.UPDATE | 3:30 PM: After service was restored, Cloudflare issued the following statement (via TechCrunch):> Earlier today, a widespread BGP routing leak affected a number of Internet services and a portion of traffic to Cloudflare. All of Cloudflare's systems continued to run normally, but traffic wasn't getting to us for a portion of our domains. At this point, the network outage has been fixed and traffic levels are returning to normal.> > BGP acts as the backbone of the Internet, routing traffic through Internet transit providers and then to services like Cloudflare. There are more than 700k routes across the Internet. By nature, route leaks are localized and can be caused by error or through malicious intent. We've written extensively about BGP and how we've adopted RPKI to help further secure it.Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince also offered a biting take of his own on Twitter:https://twitter.com/eastdakota/status/1143182575680143361



Feds probe 'quality' of repairs on plane in Hawaii crash

Feds probe 'quality' of repairs on plane in Hawaii crashFederal investigators will review repair and inspection records on the skydiving plane that became inverted before crashing shortly after takeoff on Oahu's North Shore, killing all 11 people on board in the deadliest civil aviation accident since 2011. Repairs were then made to get the plane back into service, National Transportation Safety Board officials said at a news conference Sunday. "We will be looking at the quality of those repairs and whether it was inspected and whether it was airworthy," the NTSB's Jennifer Homendy said.



US border chief resigns amid outcry over treatment of migrant children

US border chief resigns amid outcry over treatment of migrant childrenThe acting commissioner of the US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency, John Sanders, is resigning and will leave his post on July 5, amid an outcry over the treatment of detained migrant children. His departure comes amid mounting public backlash over alarmingly unsanitary conditions at an overcrowded migrant facility in Clint, Texas where the discovery of poor care and lack of access to showers or clean clothing prompted the relocation of 250 detained children. The situation has led immigration activists and Democrats to step up criticism of President Donald Trump's hard-line immigration policies. Mr Sanders, whose resignation was first reported by The New York Times, has led the agency since April, when Mr Trump reshuffled the management of US immigration agencies under the Department of Homeland Security. Before taking over CBP, he was the agency's chief operating officer and had also been the Transportation Security Administration's chief technology officer. A temporary detention facility in Clint, Texas Credit: AFP Mr Trump said he had not ask for Mr Sanders to quit, calling him a good man and saying he did not know why he decided to resign. Dealing with a surge of migrants at the US -Mexico border has been a priority for Mr Trump - but the president has proven unable to push most of his goals through Congress. On Tuesday, Democrats in the House of Representatives said they plan to approve $4.5 billion (£3.5 billion) in emergency funding to address the crisis caused by the migrant surge, but the measure has drawn a veto threat from Mr Trump. "This week we have to solve the humanitarian crisis," Hakeem Jeffries, chair of the House Democratic Caucus Chairman said, predicting that the funding package would pass the House with a "strong Democratic vote." But lawmakers were also rushing to add language before the vote to mandate better health and nutrition standards at border facilities. The changes were being made after some liberal Democrats expressed alarm that not enough was being done to improve conditions at the border, where the number of migrants apprehended surged in May to the highest level since 2006.



FedEx sues US government over shipment restrictions

FedEx sues US government over shipment restrictionsAmerican logistics giant FedEx sued the US government on Monday, saying Washington's restrictions on exports and imports due to growing trade disputes and sanctions created an "impossible burden" for delivery firms. The announcement of the lawsuit comes as Beijing and Washington face off in a trade war that has seen both sides exchange steep tariffs on hundreds of billions in exports. A statement by the delivery firm said the restrictions placed "an unreasonable burden on FedEx to police the millions of shipments that transit our network every day" or face heavy fines.



Corona: Sheriff's deputies make arrests, impound dozens of vehicles at street racing gathering

Corona: Sheriff's deputies make arrests, impound dozens of vehicles at street racing gatheringSheriff's deputies broke up a large gathering of street racers who had taken over a parking lot in Corona, authorities said.



109 Bacon Recipes That Are Seriously Addictive

109 Bacon Recipes That Are Seriously Addictive



Iran drone downing highlights limitations of US unmanned aircraft

Iran drone downing highlights limitations of US unmanned aircraftUS drones have been a key tool in conflicts against insurgent organizations such as the Taliban and the Islamic State group, but Iran's downing of one of the aircraft highlights their limitations against more sophisticated adversaries. While drones offer the significant attraction of not putting American lives at risk and can stay aloft for more than a day, allowing for extended surveillance missions, they can be vulnerable to air defenses, are often expensive, and their loss can lead to sensitive hardware falling into the wrong hands. "I believe sophisticated air defenses will continue to have good chances to shoot down an aircraft like an RQ-4 whenever it is in position to do meaningful surveillance of their territories or other assets," he said, referring to the type of drone brought down by Iran last week near the strategic Strait of Hormuz.



'Imagine your own children there': Grim reports mount from border detention camps

'Imagine your own children there': Grim reports mount from border detention campsAs more reports surfaced of inhumane conditions at the government’s migrant detention facilities, the movement to label them “concentration camps” picked up steam with backing from a major newspaper.




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